Commentary


More – Becket on Film

Links The Work The Life Commentarty

Commentary

Books without prices are out of print but may be ordered from your local library.

Beckett on Film (Channel 4, 2001) £4.95.
A colour booklet produced to accompany the project. It includes a biography, an introduction to Beckett’s ideas, an overview of his theatre career, and interviews with some of the participants in the projects. Ring the Channel 4 order line on 0870 544 66 99 or send a cheque or postal order (made payable to Channel 4 Television) for £4.95 (including postage & packing) to: Beckett on Film, PO Box 4000, Manchester M60 3LL.

The Complete Critical Guide to Samuel Beckett by David Pattie (Routledge, 2000) £11.99.
A very good guide to Beckett’s life and work, which includes an accessible and up-to-date discussion of the meaning of all of his work.

Conversations With (and About) Beckett by Mel Gussow (Nick Hern, 1996) £10.99.
Fascinating interviews with Beckett, and with actors Billie Whitelaw, Bert Lahr and Jack MacGowran, plus others. Very revealing.

Samuel Beckett: A collection of criticism edited by Ruby Cohn (McGraw Hill, 1975).
A collection of various studies of Beckett’s work, which includes Kay Boyle’s ‘All Mankind Is Us’, which interprets Waiting for Godot as an allegory of France under the Nazis.

Samuel Beckett: The critical heritage edited by Lawrence Graver and Raymond Federman (Routledge, 1979).
A useful collection of reviews and critical essays on Beckett’s work, ranging from 1934 to the late 1970s.

Samuel Beckett: A critical study by Hugh Kenner (Grove Press, 1961).
One of the earliest and most coherent studies of Becket’s work. A readable and stimulating exploration of his debt to Descartes.

Samuel Beckett: Waiting for Godot, Endgame and Krapp’s Last Tape by John Fletcher (Faber Critical Guides, 2000) £4.99.
A useful guide to three of Beckett’s major plays, with background information on his life and ideas.

The Theatre of the Absurd by Martin Esslin (Penguin, 1961) £4.95.
A study of Beckett’s plays and novels in the context of the European absurdist writers of the 1950s. Very readable and well argued.